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1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato

A Limited Production of 20 Units

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato - Front Corner with View - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato – Front Corner with View – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

During the 1960 London Motor Show, Aston Martin introduced the DB4 GT Zagato. The 1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato is a grand tourer (GT) coupe. Basically, the car begins as a DB4 GT. But, it receives alterations by the Zagato Factory in Italy, making it ever so greater. Thanks to Ercole Spada, this car became slightly smaller and more lightweight. From 1960 to 1963, Aston worked with Zagato to produce 20 total cars. Also, noteworthy, this car is to not be confused with its successor, the Aston Martin V8 Zagato.

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato - Side - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato – Side – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

3.7-Liter DOHC Straight-6 Engine

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato - Engine Bay - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato – Engine Bay – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

The 1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato sports a 3.7-liter aluminum twin-spark DOHC straight-6 motor. This engine produces 314 horsepower and 278 lb.-ft. of torque. Supporting the motor is a David Brown all-synchromesh 4-speed manual transmission. With a compression ratio of 9.7:1, this car can reach 60 mph in only 6.1 seconds. From 0 to 100 mph, the Zagato takes only 14.1 seconds. On the high end, this car can reach around 154 mph. For the time, this car was able to compete in Grand Prix and Le Mans racing events. Thankfully, due to the Zagato Factory, this car shed over 100 pounds from the base DB4 GT.

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato - Interior - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato – Interior – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

A Review of Parts & Specifications

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato - Front Fender - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato – Front Fender – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

As an older car, the 1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato has some top-notch specs from back in the day. Firstly, there is a rack and pinion steering layout, which can be seen in modern race cars as well. Next, there are wishbones, coil springs, telescopic dampers, and an anti-roll bar in the front. As per the rear, there is a live axle on coil springs. Furthermore, the brakes are Girling discs all around with no servo and separate master cylinders. On the carburetor side, there are three Weber 45 DCOE4 carbs. Finally, the car finishes off with Borrani 16×5” wire spoked alloy rims with Avon Turbospeed Mark II tires.

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato - Rear Overhead - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato – Rear Overhead – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

A Brief DB4 GT Zagato Racing History

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato - 1 VEV - Front Bumper - Silverstone 2009 - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato – 1 VEV – Front Bumper – Silverstone 2009 – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

At Goodwood in 1961 during Eastertime, the 1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato raced in its first outing. Surprisingly, the car was able to accomplish 3rd place while being driven by Stirling Moss. Next, the car made its own history by winning first place in the July 1961 British Grand Prix Support race. The model sporting “2 VEV” obtained the DB4 GT Zagato’s first victory under John Ogier’s Essex Racing Stable. Unfortunately, this car was crashed at Spa in 1962, requiring it to be rebuilt. This led to alterations which were later removed after another road accident. Finally, the DB4 GT Zagato Chassis 0200 participated in the 1962 24 Hours of Le Mans. Unfortunately, again, this car blew a piston after 9.5 hours of race time.

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato - 2 VEV - Rear - Silverstone 2009 - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato – 2 VEV – Rear – Silverstone 2009 – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

A Tip of the Hat to the DB4 GT Zagato

The Aston Martin DB4 GT Lightweight Is Much Stronger Than English Breakfast Tea – Petrolicious – YouTube

Overall, the 1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato is quite a spectacular vehicle. Initially, the MSRP of this car was $7,080 USD. At the time, this was enough money to buy a livable home. Not surprisingly, this car recently sold by RM Sotheby’s New York for $14,300,000. That is quite an increase in value for the car. Regardless, this car is worthy of its highly collectible status, especially due to 19 remaining. In conclusion, it is only right to tip a hat to the DB4 GT Zagato due to its unique history.

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato - Rear Corner - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato – Rear Corner – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

Red Bull Formula One: Aston Martin Caravan Race

Red Bull Formula One: Aston Martin Caravan Race

An Aston Towing a Caravan? Yes.

In a Top Gear style stunt, Red Bull Formula One drivers Daniel Ricciardo and Max Verstappen pull the ultimate race. Each driving an Aston Martin Vanquish variant, the two F1 drivers pull caravans around the ring. This Aston Martin caravan race takes place at the F1 Austrian Grand Prix track. At 1,760 lbs., the caravans didn’t stop the Aston Martins from a track day. Fortunately, the cars and drivers survived… unfortunately, the caravans did not.

Aston Martin & Red Bull Racing

Aston Martin Caravan Race - Towing Caravans - Red Bull Photograph - EuroDrift

Aston Martin Caravan Race – Towing Caravans – Red Bull Photograph – EuroDrift

The Aston Martin caravan race may make one ponder, what is the connection between Aston and Red Bull? Well, first off, Aston Martin is a Red Bull sponsor. This leads to a tendency of working together. Secondly, Red Bull’s involvement in the F1 racing scene has led to an interest in hypercars. Not surprisingly, Aston Martin is working with Red Bull on the stunning Valkyrie. The Aston Martin Valkyrie is a beastly machine that will shake up the hypercar realm. Unfortunately, for Aston, Red Bull vehicles are built with Renault engines.

Daniel Ricciardo & Max Verstappen

Aston Martin Caravan Race - Daniel Ricciardo and Max Verstappen - Red Bull Photograph - EuroDrift

Aston Martin Caravan Race – Daniel Ricciardo and Max Verstappen – Red Bull Photograph – EuroDrift

The drivers for the Aston Martin caravan race were Daniel Ricciardo and Max Verstappen. Ricciardo made his F1 debut in 2011 with Toro Rosso, Red Bull’s entry driver team. With 4 victories and 3rd place last year, this driver can race. During the caravan race, Ricciardo drives an Aston Martin Vanquish Volante with 576 horsepower. Now, everyone knows the Vanquish Volante is ready for the caravan road trip.

On the other hand, Max Verstappen made his start in F1 racing in 2015. Surprisingly, Verstappen was only 17 years old! This makes him the youngest F1 driver in history. This stunt wasn’t completely new as Verstappen. He once took the Red Bull F1 car up an Austrian Alps ski slope… yes, really. Lastly, Verstappen drove an Aston Martin Vanquish S Volante with 603 horsepower in the race.

Ready to See the Race? Hell Yes!

A Caravan Race with an F1 twist! Daniel Ricciardo and Max Verstappen take to the Red Bull Ring – Aston Martin Red Bull Racing – YouTube

The Red Bull Racing Aston Martin caravan race is quite the spectacle. Who would’ve thought Aston Martin’s can tug a caravan along the track? Well, if you don’t know, now you know. If you did know, then… good for you. Unfortunately, in recent years, Red Bull is struggling with the hybrid powertrain rules from 2014. Regardless, Red Bull can still put on quite the show, on and off the F1 track. In conclusion, the Aston Martin Vanquish is a powerhouse waiting to show the world what it is capable of… or not?

Aston Martin Caravan Race - View of Caravans, Drivers, & Vehicles - Red Bull Photograph - EuroDrift

Aston Martin Caravan Race – View of Caravans, Drivers, & Vehicles – Red Bull Photograph – EuroDrift

Ferrari 641: 6 Wins in 1990 Formula 1 Season

Ferrari 641: 6 Wins in 1990 Formula 1 Season

The Formula 1 Ferrari 641

Ferrari 641 - Formula One Race Car - Front Corner - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

Ferrari 641 – Formula One Race Car – Front Corner – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

In the 1990 Formula 1 season, Ferrari used the 641, also known as the F1-90. This Formula 1 racing car was the main vehicle of the Ferrari racing team for the entirety of the season. The Ferrari 641’s design is by Enrique Scalabroni and Steve Nichols. Furthermore, Steve Nichols was a McLaren designer who helped the project. With 6 wins during the 1990 Formula 1 season, the Ferrari 641 was competitive with McLaren, but at 10 horsepower less. At high speed, the 641 held its ground regardless of the power difference.

Ferrari Tipo 036/037 3.5-Liter Mid-Engine V12

Ferrari 641 - Formula One Race Car - Front Corner - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

Ferrari 641 – Formula One Race Car – Front Corner – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

The Ferrari 641 sports a Ferrari Tipo 036 3.5-liter mid-engine V12. This motor is capable of 680 base horsepower. Furthermore, the engine works in combo with a 7-speed semi-auto transmission. In San Marino, the 641 withheld the number 037 engine instead. This motor works on Agip fuel, a former Italian auto gasoline. To get the power to the ground, the 641 has Goodyear tires. The Ferrari 641, or F1-90, definitely packed the power to compete in the 90s Formula 1 season.

Race Worthy Engineering: Chassis & Suspension

Ferrari 641 - Formula One Race Car - Side - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

Ferrari 641 – Formula One Race Car – Side – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

The Ferrari 641 Formula 1 race car was built with a race worthy chassis and suspension. Firstly, the 641’s chassis comprimes a Kevlar and carbon fiber composite monocoque. Next, the suspension differs slightly in the front and rear. Both the front and the rear contain anti-roll bars, double wishbones, and telescopic shock absorbers. In the front, there is push-rod actuated torsion bar springs. On the other end, in the rear, there is push-rod actuated coil springs. Surprisingly, only one 641 chassis is non existent today due to destruction in testing. Lastly, while two remain in museums, four are privately owned by collectors.

A Throwback to 1990 Formula 1 Racing

Ferrari 641/2 – 1990 (Emozione Ferrari) – sagitt76 – YouTube

This Ferrari 641 article is basically a throwback to the 1990 Formula 1 Racing season. Although this vehicle was not the best race car on the track, it still won 6 races. One of these vehicles was also in a famous collision at the Japanese Grand Prix with the McLaren race car. The Ferrari 641 and the McLaren battled it out frequently for whom was the best car. Regardless of who was better, both cars deserve respect from car enthusiasts worldwide. In conclusion, the Ferrari 641 was a beastly feat of engineering that competed with the “crème de la crème” (cream of the crop).

Ferrari 641 - Formula One Race Car - Rear Corner - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

Ferrari 641 – Formula One Race Car – Rear Corner – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

Ferrari 641 - Formula One Race Car - Actively Racing - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

Ferrari 641 – Formula One Race Car – Actively Racing – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815: Enzo Ferrari’s 1st Vehicle

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815: Enzo Ferrari’s 1st Vehicle

Enzo Ferrari’s 1st Vehicle

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 - Front - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 – Front – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

The 1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni is the first vehicle designed and built by Enzo Ferrari in Modena, Italy. In 1938 Ferrari left his position at Alfa Romeo running the Scuderia Ferrari racing division. From here, he decided it was time for him to begin his own automotive manufacturer. Unfortunately, his contract with Alfa Romeo forbade him from reviving the Scuderia Ferrari racing team for 4 years. So, Enzo Ferrari went forward by creating a business titled Auto Avio Costruzioni (AAC).

The 1940 Brescia Grand Prix

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 - Front Corner - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 – Front Corner – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

Although his business’s purposes was to build aircraft parts for the Italian government, this is where he built his first car. In December of 1939, AAC was commissioned by Lotario, Marquis of Modena, to build two race cars for the 1940 Brescia Grand Prix. The race cars he built for Lotario would become the AAC Tipo 815. Enzo Ferrari’s first vehicle was able to participate in the 1940 Brescia Grand Prix. Unfortunately, both models didn’t finish due to engine problems. One of these vehicles was scrapped by Lotario’s brother while the other one was sold to a car collector in Italy.

2-Seat Barchetta with 1.5-Liter SOHC I8 Engine

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 - Engine - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 – Engine – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

The 1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 is a 2-seat Barchetta with a 1.5-liter SOHC I8 engine. This motor has two valves per cylinder and a semi-dry sump lubrication system. Furthermore, this engine has 4 Weber 30DRZ carburetors. In addition, this engine produces 75 horsepower at its peak. At only 1,378 lbs., this power was adequate for racing at the time. Unfortunately, this engine is also the reason that the 815 didn’t complete the Grand Prix.

Bodywork by Carrozzeria Touring and Dubonnet Suspension

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 - Side - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 – Side – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

For the suspension system, the 1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 has quite an interesting setup. First, the car features a Dubonnet suspension with an integral shock absorber at the front. On the rear, this car sports a live axle on semi-elliptical leaf springs and hydraulic shock absorbers. For the bodywork, the work is by Carrozzeria Touring using Itallumag 35, an aluminum and magnesium alloy. Furthermore, this bodywork only weighs 119 lbs. which allows the vehicle to hit a top speed of around 110 mph.

The Beginning of the Ferrari Manufacturer Dream

Ferrari Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 startup at Museo Casa Enzo Ferrari – Andrea Manieri – YouTube

Overall, the 1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 is Enzo Ferrari’s 1st vehicle. Although Alfa Romeo didn’t want Enzo to pursue a racing team, it was his dream and goal. Alfa Romeo may have prevented Enzo was labeling his first Ferrari but Auto Avio Costruzioni was the beginning. Thankfully, the marquis of Modena was kind enough to choose Enzo for his race car builds. In conclusion, without the AAC 815, Ferrari may have never built the brand that we know today.

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 - Rear Corner - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 – Rear Corner – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

1947 Ferrari 125 S: Ferrari’s 1st Vehicle

1947 Ferrari 125 S: Ferrari’s 1st Vehicle

The World’s First Ferrari

On May 11, 1947, the Ferrari 125 S made its debut at the Piacenza Racing Circuit. The 1947 Ferrari 125 S is the first vehicle produced and built by Ferrari of Modena, Italy. Although, the 125 S preceded Enzo Ferrari’s first build, the 1940 Auto Avio 815. From this model, Ferrari began its legacy in performance and racing for the years to come. There were only two 125 S units which were strictly for racing purposes, not for sale. On the debut day, the vehicle was driven by Franco Cortese. Unfortunately, the vehicle was unable to finish its first race.

1.5-Liter Colombo 125 V12 Engine


The 1947 Ferrari 125 S sports a 1.5-liter Colombo 125 V12 engine. This motor produces 118 base horsepower. It works in combination with a 5-speed traverse transmission. Furthermore, the engine is a SOHC design with 2 valves per cylinder. Moreover, it uses 3 double-choke Weber 30DCF carburetors.

Brakes, Chassis, & Suspension

For the chassis, the 1947 Ferrari 125S has a steel-tube frame. This works in combination with performance style brakes and suspension for the 1940s era. The suspension setup is a double wishbone with transverse leaf springs in the front. On the rear, there is a live axle. Lastly, the vehicle contains hydraulic power drum brakes in the front and rear. For the time, this car was built to perform under competitive racing conditions.

Victory at Grand Prix of Rome

1947 Ferrari 125 S - Front Corner with Unknown Passengers - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

1947 Ferrari 125 S – Front Corner with Unknown Passengers – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

Two weeks after its debut, the 1947 Ferrari 125 S won the Grand Prix of Rome. This race was held on the Terme di Caracalla Circuit. The driver for this race was Franco Cortese who revenged his loss in this vehicle. Overall, in 1947, the 125 S won 6 out of 14 total races. For a first build, Enzo Ferrari did pretty well with a 42.8% chance of winning each race.

The Ferrari 125 S was the Beginning of Ferrari’s Racing Legendry


Overall, the 1947 Ferrari 125 S began Ferrari’s racing legendry. With this vehicle, Ferrari became competitive in the racing world and it was just the beginning. With high determination and experience from working at Alfa Romeo, Enzo Ferrari took his new brand to the next level. Although many people today don’t appreciate the older vehicles, this car will forever hold its place in history. For those who don’t know, Ferrari celebrated 70 years in March of 2017. In conclusion, the Ferrari 125 S is a racing masterpiece from the 1940s.

1947 Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa: One of the World’s Oldest Ferrari Race Cars

1947 Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa: One of the World’s Oldest Ferrari Race Cars

One of the World’s Oldest Ferrari Race Cars

The 1947 Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa is one of the world’s oldest Ferrari race cars. The 47 Spyder Corsa was built following World War II by Ferrari S.p.A. after Enzo Ferrari left his mechanic and racing position at Alfa Romeo. Recently, a 1947 166 Spyder Corsa with the engine build number ‘002’ was rebuilt by Jim Glickenhaus of Pebble Beach, California. Initially purchased at auction for $770,000 in 2004, this 166 Spyder Corsa was restored with a hefty investment of $500,000. Furthermore, this Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa may now be worth around $8,000,000.

2.0-Liter Supercharged SOHC Colombo V12 Engine

Under the hood, the 1947 Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa sports a 2.0-liter supercharged SOHC Colombo V12 engine. This motor produces 128 horsepower and 117 lb.-ft. of torque. In combination with a 5-speed manual transmission, this car can reach around 100 mph. This engine also features two valves per cylinder and 3 Weber carbs. Lastly, the rebuilt model features the build number ‘002’ which makes it the second 166 SC built by Ferrari.

Victory at the 1947 Turin Grand Prix

The engine in the 1947 Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa allowed Ferrari to win the 1947 Turin Grand Prix. The 166 SC is an iconic showcase of race car styling in the late 1940s. Although not powerful in today’s terms, this car was a beast of a machine at the time. You may also be wondering what happened to the ‘001’ model of the 166 Spyder Corsa. Unfortunately, the ‘001’ model was lost in an accident.

Current Market Estimation of $8,000,000 Value


Overall, the 1947 Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa is the one of the world’s oldest Ferrari race cars. Worth an investment of $1,270,000, the 166 SC may now be worth around $8,000,000. The old frame and motor collaborate to create a unique collector’s car. The 166 Spyder Corsa is a beautiful, rare spectacle that is truly a one-of-a-kind vehicle. In conclusion, the Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa is the definition of an original Ferrari.

Note: The picture and video are of 1948 Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa race cars, not 1947 models. The above mentioned ‘002’ model is a 1947 vehicle.

Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale: 50th Birthday (August 2017)

Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale: 50th Birthday (August 2017)

Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale’s 50th Birthday

In August 2017, the Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale celebrated its 50th birthday. The 33 Stradale was originally penned by Franco Scaglione in Italy. Currently, the Museo Storio Museum in Arese, Italy has a 33 Stradale on display. The Italian wording for this year’s celebration was “33 La Bellezza Necessaria” which means “33 Necessary Beauty”. These words fit perfectly with the beauty and timeless appearance of the exterior of the Stradale.

Debut at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza 1967

The Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale was initally designed around the technology of the Tipo 33 race cars. It made its debut at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza in August 1967. At this point, Alfa Romeo adapted the Quadrifoglio four-lead clover badge as a symbol of pride. Fortunately for fans, the 33 Stradale was displayed on temporary exhibit for it’s 50th birthday. If you don’t get a chance to see it here, there’s always next time.

33 Stradale’s Chassis Used for Many Concept Vehicles

From the Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale’s chassis, there were multiple concept cars designed over the years. These cars include the 33/2 Daytona, 33 SC 12 Turbo, 33TT12, Carabo, and Iguana. There’s a good chance you may have never heard of some or all of the vehicles. But, they were all created by Alfa Romeo on the 33 Stradale’s chassis. Each car had its own styling and purpose, ranging from full out race car to pedestrian concept car.

2.0-Liter V8 Engine with 6-Speed Colotti Manual Transmission

The Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale is a rear mid-engine two door vehicle. It was produced from November 1967 to March 1969 and assembled in Milan, Italy. The 33 Stradale sports a 2.0-liter V8 engine couped with a 6-speed Colotti manual transmission. At only 1,543 lbs, this was a very lightweight vehicle with an estimated 230 horsepower. This allows the car to hit 60 mph in 5.5 seconds, which was quick upon release but can be considered a bit sluggish in modern times. The 33 Stradale has a top speed of 160 mph.

Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale is Worth Over $10 Million in Today’s Market


Overall, the Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale is a legendary car that hit it’s 50th birthday in August 2017. Initially sold for $17,000 in 1968, the 33 Stradale is worth well over $10 million in current times. As a rare spectacle, many are not fortunate enough to see this beautiful vehicle. For car collectors, this car equates to the dreams of many. In the end, the Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale is a beautiful and timeless car that helped shape the way of racing through the years.

Autobahn History and Statistics

There’s a popular misconception that there are no speed limits on the Autobahn. About 40% of the German Autobahn system is speed regulated. However, did you immediately catch the significance of that? If 40% is regulated, that means 60% is NOT.

Today’s German Autobahn system stretches 8,047 miles across most of Germany. They post speed limits on the Autobahn near cities and across stretches with a history of accidents. However, even then, the speed limit stays a fast 81 mph.

History of the Autobahn

In 1929, Germany built its first Autobahn link between Opladen and Dusseldorf. After seeing the benefits of this high-speed road system, Adolf Hitler started a program to build two east-west and north-south links. However, despite the propaganda of the time, the Autobahn was not built for military purposes. Before the horrendous acts that led to World War II began to occur in the late 1930s, the Autobahn helped bring Germany out of the depression. The road system allowed Germany to promote economic growth by generating additional jobs in construction.

Initially, the limited-access road was used by the Mercedes-Benz Grand Prix racing team for high-speed record attempts. Rudolf Caracciola set one of the highest speeds for a public roadway during this time. The racing came to an end in 1938 with the tragic death of a popular German race driver, Bern Rosemeyer. Shortly after, when the War broke out, they used the roads  for military transport.

After WWII, new sections of the system were added onto the existing Autobahns. Each decade saw additions to the roads until they reached their current span just after the turn of the Millennium.

“The Autobahn” is a Misnomer

Often, foreigners will refer to the German road system as “The Autobahn” when in fact it forms a series of connected roads. Similar to the interstates found in America, these roads have multiple lanes of traffic flowing in two directions. Often, they have a central barrier and shoulders to the side.

In 1974, The German government adopted an autobahn numbering system. Each road identifies itself by a capital “A” followed by a number. Larger autobahns that cross the country have single digits, while shorter roads have double digits.

Some very short stretches of road exist which they designed only for local traffic. Each of these roads uses three digits. They base which digits they use on the direction of travel (e.g. east to west, north to south).

The Speed Limit on the German Autobahns

The autobahns serve as the German freeways. As we already stated, over half of these roads do not post set speed limits. The ones that do serve heavily congested areas near cities. Also, certain stretches of road with dangerous curves have posted regulations.

During inclement weather, parts of the Autobahn system come under speed regulation and they enforce limits set in construction zones.

Posted “recommendations” for speed limits show on the roads where no official speed regulation exists. If a car exceeds the recommendation and causes an accident, they might have liability for damages. However, it’s pretty common to see a Porsche or BMW flying down the road at over 100 mph.

In the late 1990’s, one of Germany’s political parties took up the cause of environmentalism. They claimed that the high speeds were contributing to air pollution and pushed for a national speed limit. They were unsuccessful at imposing the national limit, but they did manage to pass regulations in forested areas.

Autobahn Accident Statistics

Over the past decade, traffic fatalities across all of the European nations have seen a decline. However, a good number of accidents still occur on the Autobahn.

  • Out of the total accidents that occurred on the Autobahn, 67% of them happened in areas that featured no posted speed limit.
  • Rural road deaths that occurred on the Autobahn were 5 times more than the deaths that occurred in automobile accidents.
  • In 2013, deaths on the Autobahn rose by 8% over those in 2012.

For drivers who want to go fast, the Autobahn is perfect. Large stretches of the road have no posted speed limits and other drivers understand how to navigate speeding traffic. With over 8000 miles of road before you, you can drive for days.

How fast can you drive on the Autobahn? As fast as your car can go.

 

References

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autobahn

http://brandongaille.com/17-fascinating-autobahn-accident-statistics/

http://www.gettingaroundgermany.info/autobahn.shtml

http://www.german-autobahn.eu/

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