1964 Aston Martin DB5: “Bond, James Bond”

1964 Aston Martin DB5: “Bond, James Bond”

The Well-Known 1964 Aston Martin DB5

The 1964 Aston Martin DB5, known as the legendary Bond car, is a British luxury grand tourer (GT). The DB5 was made by Aston Martin but designed by the Italian coachbuilder Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera. This car was built from 1963 to 1965 with only 1,059 total units. The “DB” designation honors Sir David Brown, the owner of the company from 1942 to 1972. Furthermore, the DB5 obtained its popularity from the film Goldfinger in 1964.

4.0-Liter DOHC Straight Six-Cylinder Engine

Aston Martin DB5 - Engine - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

Aston Martin DB5 – Engine – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

Under the hood, the 1964 Aston Martin DB5 sports a 4.0-liter DOHC straight six-cylinder engine. This motor produces 282 base horsepower and 281 lb.-ft. of torque. For the transmission, there are two options for the DB5. The primary option is a 5-speed ZF manual box. The optional transmission is a Borg-Warner 3-speed automatic transmission. The vehicle can hit 60 mph in 8 seconds and has a top speed of 143 mph. Lastly, the weight of the DB5 is 3,311 pounds.

Factory Standard Options in the Aston Martin DB5

Aston Martin DB5 - Interior - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

Aston Martin DB5 – Interior – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

Standard options on the 1960s Aston Martin DB5 include:

  • Chrome Wire Wheels
  • Electric Windows
  • Fire Extinguisher
  • Full Leather Trim
  • Magnesium-Alloy Body
  • Oil Cooler
  • Reclining Seats
  • Twin Fuel Tanks
  • Wool Pile Carpets

The chrome wire wheels complement the exterior of the vehicle. The full leather trim, reclining seats, and wool pile carpets provide luxurious comfort in the interior. Technological wise, the electric windows were a nice feature for the time. Although the magnesium-alloy body isn’t basic knowledge, it is a superleggera inspired frame. For performance, the oil cooler and twin fuel tanks were nice features to drive in attraction. Lastly, just in case, the DB5 has a fire extinguisher.

Aston Martin DB5 - Rear - Wikimedia Commons - EuroDrift

Aston Martin DB5 – Rear – Wikimedia Commons – EuroDrift

DB5 Coupe, DB5 Convertible (Volante), and DB5 Shooting-Brake

Aston Martin DB5 Convertible (Volante) - Front Corner - Wikipedia - EuroDrift

Aston Martin DB5 Convertible (Volante) – Front Corner – Wikipedia – EuroDrift

The DB5 has 3 total variants including a coupe, convertible, and shooting-brake model. The DB5 Vantage Coupe is the basic model with the solid roof and James Bond style design. Next, the DB5 Convertible, or the DB5 Volante, is a drop-top version of the coupe. For general knowledge, Volante was not in use at the time by Aston Martin. Lastly, the Shooting-Brake concept model was specially produced for Sir David Brown in a wagon style coupe.

Aston Martin DB5 Shooting Brake - Front Corner - Wikipedia - EuroDrift

Aston Martin DB5 Shooting Brake – Front Corner – Wikipedia – EuroDrift

“The names Bond, James Bond”

The fame of the 1960s Aston Martin DB5 started with the famous 007 film Goldenfinger in 1964. The silver-birch DB5 was chosen by John Stears, the special effects expert for the movie at the time. In the movie, the DB5 prototype was used as well as a base model for stunts. The DB5 also made an appearance in multiple other 007 films including GoldenEye, Skyfall, Spectre, and Tomorrow Never Dies. Bond wasn’t the only movie series that the DB5 made an appearance in. The DB5 was also in two other films: The Cannonball Run and Thunderball.

“The most famous car in the world”

The 1960s Aston Martin DB5 became famous for its appearance in Goldenfinger alone. This led Aston Martin to display the car at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. This appearance let to a surge in sales of the limited 1,059 models. At this event, the DB5 was dubbed “the most famous car in the world” at the time. Now, the DB5 is a rare spectacle and more so a collector’s car. Although, they do tend to make appearances at modern day car shows in certain cities.

Currently, the DB5 is worth an estimated $750,000 to $1,250,000


In the end, the 1964 Aston Martin DB5 is a forever famous grand tourer. With it’s large straight six and it’s gullwing doors, this car stuns spectators still today. In modern times, the 1960s DB5 ranges in price from roughly $750,000 minimum to around $1,250,000. With time, this price will only increase as the models gain age. In conclusion, the 1964 Aston Martin DB5 is the true car of “Bond, James Bond”.

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