2013 Audi S5 Ownership & Review

2013 Audi S5 3.0T Coupe

2013 Audi S5
2013 Audi S5 - Front - Photoshop - Manchester, Connecticut - EuroDrift
2013 Audi S5 - Front - Photoshop - Manchester, Connecticut - EuroDrift
2013 Audi S5 - Front - Photoshop - Manchester, Connecticut - EuroDrift
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In the summer of 2012, Audi released their new 2013 re-styled B8.5 Audi S5 3.0T Coupe into the market. The 2013 Audi S5 3.0T Coupe included body and interior styling alterations as well as brand new LED headlights. On top of this, it sports a 3.0 Liter V6 supercharged TFSI engine unleashing 333 Horsepower and 325 lb.-ft. of torque.

In anticipation of the release, I placed a down payment on a fully loaded 2013 Audi S5. This includes the Adaptive Cruise Control and Audi Drive Select. It even has the rear shade which is rare, according to the local dealership.

Arrival of the S5 to the U.S.

I chose the car in the color of Phantom Black Pearl with a black and magma red interior. I waited anxiously all summer for the vehicle to arrive. During the last weeks of August 2012, the beautiful and marvelous Audi S5 entered my life. Easily, it became the best car I ever owned. (compared to a 2007 Audi A4 2.0T and a 2010 Audi S4 3.0T which were both great cars as well).

Modifications & Specifications

Initially, I wasn’t completely sure about the magma red interior but I absolutely fell in love with it upon delivery. The color combination looks absolutely stunning on the car, especially with the 19” wheels. I quickly obtained my first mod of tinted windows, which has been a must since my first car and I truly love the increased appeal (at least in my view) of the vehicle. After that, I went ahead and purchased quite a few other mods over the next 20,000 miles including:

  • Audi Black Styling Package Grille
  • Audi RS5 Interior Door Handles
  • Audi S5 OEM Bi-Xenon E-Code Headlights
  • AWE Resonated Downpipe System
  • AWE Stage 2 Performance Pulley Kit
  • AWE Tuning S-FLO Intake System
  • AWE Tuning Touring Edition Exhaust System
  • ECS Tuning 15mm Wheel Spacer Kit
  • ECS Tuning Billet Aluminum Oil Filter Housing Cap
  • Eurocode Alu Kreuz Billet Aluminum Drivetrain Stabilizer
  • EuroGear DEVAL Carbon Fiber Front Lip Spoiler
  • EuroGear DEVAL Carbon Fiber Rear Diffuser
  • I.A.C. Stage 1 Performance Software
  • H&R Front & Rear Sway Bars
  • H&R OE Sport Springs
  • Höen Endurance (Yellow) Fog Lights
  • Michelin Pilot Alpin PA4 Asymmetric XL 255/35R-19 Tires (Winter)
  • Michelin Pilot Super Sport XL 255/35ZR-19 Tires (Summer)
  • MTC Engine Oil Dipstick
  • WeatherTech FloorLiner (Winter Purposes)
  • Window Tint

Before & After the Modifications

Before the mods were on the car, it felt as if the suspension had some roll during cornering which I personally disliked. This led me to purchase suspension mods such as springs and sway bars to alleviate the roll – which it did phenomenally. The front and rear carbon fiber enhancements provided an increased sporty look to the vehicle making it even more visually appealing. Although the engine mods are mostly hidden under the hood, the power increase is probably 100+ crank horsepower for peak numbers. Especially if considering that the tune alone adds 71 wheel horsepower as well as 32 lb.-ft. of wheel torque on 91 octane fuel (please note: these numbers are based on power to the wheels, not at crank). On top of that, I personally only use 93 octane or above for my car as respect to this powerful beast. I also prefer 0W-40 oil as used in Porsche V6 and V8 models.

Daily Driving the S5


I drove this car as my daily driver, running typical errands and using it to commute into town for work through horrendous traffic. The only downside of commuting to town, on top of traffic, was that I couldn’t hear the exhaust rumbling up the RPM gauge sitting in dead stop traffic – and those potholes, but those are avoidable (hopefully). I honestly thoroughly enjoyed every aspect of this car from its looks to its power to its entertainment system. I have been the proud owner of my car since the summer of 2012, and I am approaching my 5th year with the car at over 40,000 miles. It has completed road trips for me from my hometown to places such as Boston, Charleston, Chicago, Detroit, Miami, Orlando, Stowe, and more. The car even completed, with no trouble, two non-stop voyages from Florida to the northeast of the U.S. at 12 hours and 17 hours respectively – which I will never recommend to anyone. I drove the entire time and I felt it each time for days.

The B8.5 Aud S5 is Reliable, Safe, & Overall Fun to Drive

I personally have a strong passion for this vehicle as it has truly been a part of my life for almost five years. It participated in everything from meeting my significant other to completing road trips nationwide. If you’re looking for a great car, the B8.5 Audi S5 has proven reliable, safe, and overall fun to drive. I do not regret the decision to go from the S4 to the S5 and I am glad I did so. I’m also glad I decided on a red interior as at first, I was skeptical. The car, especially with the mods, is a stealthy powerhouse and receives attention everywhere I drive it. As a passionate automotive enthusiast, the S5 has filled my desire for a sporty daily driver.

    Recent Videos

  • German Car Brand Pronunciation

    Communicating Sheep - Pixabay - EuroDrift

    For years, people have been debating how to properly pronounce German car brands such as Audi, BMW, and Mercedes-Benz. For many of us, it was simply based on local letter sounds leading to a few varieties of how to say them properly. Now, a German YouTuber called Speed Comparer shared a video correcting the people of the world. The video not only discloses how to properly say German car brand names, it it overall quite hilarious. In this article, we will go over how to properly pronounce German car brands according to Speed Comparer.

    Audi

    For Audi, many people pronounce this wrong due to language sound basics. For instance, letters are pronounced different in English than German. The correct way to say Audi is “Ou-Dee”. The “Ou” sounds similar to saying “Ow” as if you were expressing a sudden pain. Saying “Aww-Dee” or “Auh-Dee” are incorrect according to the German language. Most people pronounce the first two letters of Audi incorrectly leading to the problem. Please note, it is harder to convey how a brand should sound via writing so I am doing my best to sound it out according to the video.

    BMW

    In the case of BMW, most people outside of Germany say literally “BMW”. In Germany, the “W” sounds different which leads to the real name sounding like “BMV”. “BMW” stands for “Bayerische Motoren Werke” which translates to “Bavarian Motor Works”. As expected, “Bayerische Motoren Werke” sounds more like “Buy-Er-Shurr Motoren Verker”. Again, hopefully you are able to sound it correctly from the text but please refer to the video just in case.

    Mercedes-Benz

    For Mercedes-Benz, most people say it exactly how it sounds “Mercedes-Benz” with a long sounded “Benz”. The real way to say this in German sounds like “Murrsaydees-Benz” where the “Benz” is very quickly stated. This is probably the least off-sounding pronunciation compared to the rest. Basically, stating “Mercedes-Benz” in German is much faster paced and sounds more direct to the point while in English it tends to drag on. This is also part of the reason many Americans will refer to Mercedes-Benz as simply “Benz”.

    Opel

    Opel, another German manufacturer, is another example of a mispronounced name. Most people say “O-Pall” while it should be “O-Pell!”. As stated, “Every booger drives an Opel”. Opel is not sold in the United States so it is less commonly spoke of, but still incorrectly. Speed Comparer refers to the Opel as a car for 16-17 year old girl.

    Porsche

    One of the most popular German brands, Porsche, is stated completely wrong by most Americans. In the U.S., most people state “Poor-Shh” while it is properly stated as “Poor-Shah”. You can also think of it as saying “Porscia” where the “c” sounds like a “sh”. You may be thinking that sounds like a girls name, but it is definitely one hell of a car. Porsches are a beautiful feat of engineering and stating the name properly should be the way it is.

    Volkswagen

    Lastly, Volkswagen, or VW, is another common mispronunciation. First, “VW” is pronounced like “Fahl-Vey”. This sounds completely different than speed in English but that is how it sounds. The entire name, “Volkswagen”, sounds like “Fahlkswagen”. The Volkswagen means the “car of the people”. This name probably has the biggest gap in mispronunciation due to letters sounding differently.

    Saying German Car Names Incorrectly is a Way of Life

    Overall, saying German car names incorrectly is a way of life in the U.S. and other parts of the world. This article is simply to bring to light the correct pronunciation of car names, whether you use them or not. Honestly, most people in the U.S. and other parts of the world will probably say your stating it wrong. But, in reality, the German way is how the names are properly stated. Hopefully, you found this article entertaining as well as received help on how to properly say German car brands.

     

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