2015 Mercedes-Benz GLA250 4MATIC Review

2015 Mercedes-Benz GLA250 4MATIC - Front - EuroDrift

2015 Mercedes-Benz GLA250 4MATIC – Front – EuroDrift

After 2 years with a 2015 Mercedes-Benz GLA250 4MATIC, the car displayed both positives and negatives. Starting at a MSRP of around $34,225, the GLA is the little brother of the GL series. The 2015 GLA250 4MATIC sports a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine pushing 208 horsepower and 258 lb.-ft. of torque. The GLA250 4MATIC can complete a 0-60 mph acceleration in 6.4 seconds. In circular turning, the GLA recorded 0.87 g.

2015 Mercedes-Benz GLA250 4MATIC Positives & Negatives

On the positive side, the 2015 Mercedes-Benz GLA250 4MATIC has a comfortable interior and ride. The interior has a sporty design with leatherette and inlay options. The suspension maintains a sporty feel while providing the comfort a Benz is expected to offer. For a SUV, the GLA250 isn’t a terrible gas guzzler, leading to a positive fuel consumption experience. Lastly, the GLA250 styling is sleek and sporty.

On the negative side, the 2015 Mercedes-Benz GLA250 4MATIC boasts blind spots and disappointing tech. The design of the vehicle increases the blind spots of the vehicle, making blind spot assist a highly recommended feature. Tech wise, the navigation unit is disappointing compared to Audi’s Google Maps integration. The system is a bit difficult to navigate for beginners and is not extremely user friendly. Hopefully, this is being improved in the face lifted version of the car. On top of that, an issue in the vehicle reviewed was the display unit which would tends to shut off for a few seconds when hitting bumps or potholes on the road. In major cities in the Northeast U.S., this makes the display unit dip a frequent occurrence.

The 2015 GLA250 4MATIC Holds to the Mercedes-Benz Reputation

Overall, the 2015 Mercedes-Benz GLA250 4MATIC proved to be a pretty decent automobile. The comfort and sportiness made up for the discrepancies in the technology. From what was seen at the North American International Auto Show 2017 in Detroit, the GLA250 facelift offered enhancements in each direction. If you’re considering purchasing a used GLA250 4MATIC, you aren’t making the wrong decision. In the end, you won’t be disappointed with your experience.

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  • German Car Brand Pronunciation

    Communicating Sheep - Pixabay - EuroDrift

    For years, people have been debating how to properly pronounce German car brands such as Audi, BMW, and Mercedes-Benz. For many of us, it was simply based on local letter sounds leading to a few varieties of how to say them properly. Now, a German YouTuber called Speed Comparer shared a video correcting the people of the world. The video not only discloses how to properly say German car brand names, it it overall quite hilarious. In this article, we will go over how to properly pronounce German car brands according to Speed Comparer.

    Audi

    For Audi, many people pronounce this wrong due to language sound basics. For instance, letters are pronounced different in English than German. The correct way to say Audi is “Ou-Dee”. The “Ou” sounds similar to saying “Ow” as if you were expressing a sudden pain. Saying “Aww-Dee” or “Auh-Dee” are incorrect according to the German language. Most people pronounce the first two letters of Audi incorrectly leading to the problem. Please note, it is harder to convey how a brand should sound via writing so I am doing my best to sound it out according to the video.

    BMW

    In the case of BMW, most people outside of Germany say literally “BMW”. In Germany, the “W” sounds different which leads to the real name sounding like “BMV”. “BMW” stands for “Bayerische Motoren Werke” which translates to “Bavarian Motor Works”. As expected, “Bayerische Motoren Werke” sounds more like “Buy-Er-Shurr Motoren Verker”. Again, hopefully you are able to sound it correctly from the text but please refer to the video just in case.

    Mercedes-Benz

    For Mercedes-Benz, most people say it exactly how it sounds “Mercedes-Benz” with a long sounded “Benz”. The real way to say this in German sounds like “Murrsaydees-Benz” where the “Benz” is very quickly stated. This is probably the least off-sounding pronunciation compared to the rest. Basically, stating “Mercedes-Benz” in German is much faster paced and sounds more direct to the point while in English it tends to drag on. This is also part of the reason many Americans will refer to Mercedes-Benz as simply “Benz”.

    Opel

    Opel, another German manufacturer, is another example of a mispronounced name. Most people say “O-Pall” while it should be “O-Pell!”. As stated, “Every booger drives an Opel”. Opel is not sold in the United States so it is less commonly spoke of, but still incorrectly. Speed Comparer refers to the Opel as a car for 16-17 year old girl.

    Porsche

    One of the most popular German brands, Porsche, is stated completely wrong by most Americans. In the U.S., most people state “Poor-Shh” while it is properly stated as “Poor-Shah”. You can also think of it as saying “Porscia” where the “c” sounds like a “sh”. You may be thinking that sounds like a girls name, but it is definitely one hell of a car. Porsches are a beautiful feat of engineering and stating the name properly should be the way it is.

    Volkswagen

    Lastly, Volkswagen, or VW, is another common mispronunciation. First, “VW” is pronounced like “Fahl-Vey”. This sounds completely different than speed in English but that is how it sounds. The entire name, “Volkswagen”, sounds like “Fahlkswagen”. The Volkswagen means the “car of the people”. This name probably has the biggest gap in mispronunciation due to letters sounding differently.

    Saying German Car Names Incorrectly is a Way of Life

    Overall, saying German car names incorrectly is a way of life in the U.S. and other parts of the world. This article is simply to bring to light the correct pronunciation of car names, whether you use them or not. Honestly, most people in the U.S. and other parts of the world will probably say your stating it wrong. But, in reality, the German way is how the names are properly stated. Hopefully, you found this article entertaining as well as received help on how to properly say German car brands.

     

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