Volkswagen at NAIAS 2017

Three of Volkswagen’s newest models were featured prominently at the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS). First, was the Tiguan, a compact crossover vehicle previously introduced in 2007. Volkswagen also prominently displayed the 2018 Volkswagen Atlas, their full-size sports utility vehicle. However, the car that generated the most “buzz” was the I.D. Buzz concept car.

Volkswagen at NAIAS 2017
2017 Volkswagen Tiguan - Front - NAIAS 2017 - EuroDrift
2017 Volkswagen Tiguan - Front - NAIAS 2017 - EuroDrift
2017 Volkswagen Tiguan - Front - NAIAS 2017 - EuroDrift
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The Tiguan

The Tiguan uses the PQ35 platform developed for the Volkswagen Golf. The previous version of the Tiguan featured two rows of seating. However, in 2018 a third-row of seats will be standard on all front-wheel-drive versions of the car and optional on the all-wheel drive cars.

“I truly believe that this auto show marks a real turning point for Volkswagen in the United States, based on an upcoming strong product momentum with vehicles that are truly tailored to what American buyers want,” – Hinrich J. Woebcken, VW North America CEO

Optional on the 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan are all the new Volkswagen safety systems: forward-collision warning, blind-spot detection, pedestrian monitoring, and lane-departure warnings.

Under the hood, the Tiguan sports a 2.0-Liter Turbocharged Direct-Injection Engine. This spunky little motor puts out 184 Horsepower and 221 lb.-ft. of torque. The engine is paired with an 8-speed automatic transmission with a manual shifting mode.

The Atlas – Volkswagen’s Full-Size SUV

The Atlas is the largest vehicle Volkswagen produces on its Volkswagen Group MQB platform. Unlike some SUVs, the third-row seating comfortably accommodates adults. Despite the size, the Atlas drives more like a car than an SUV.

The 280 Horsepower, 3.6-Liter V6 engine produces plenty of power for acceleration and hill climbing. A 238 Horsepower four-cylinder engine will be an option for the Atlas, along with Volkswagen’s all-wheel drive system. All versions of the Atlas include an eight-speed automatic transmission.

The Weekender edition of the Atlas offers amenities that remind one of the Vanagon (Microbus). Plenty of cargo space along with a built-in pet barrier makes road trips more comfortable. Carriers for skis, bikes, and other sports equipment make it easy to pack up for a weekend of fun. The 2018 Atlas is Volkswagen’s answer to the modern recreational vehicle.

The I.D. Buzz Reinvents the Classic VW Van

Volkswagen took their classic van and turned it on its head. First of all, the I.D. Buzz is all electric. Second, it offers autonomous driving. Third, it seats eight passengers. There is only a few things about the I.D. Buzz that resemble other Volkswagen models.

The I.D. Buzz runs on Volkswagen’s Modular Electric Drive Kit (MEB). The MEB has been in development since 2015 and is similar to what powers the Tesla. The Buzz can go 270 miles on one charge. With the I.D. Buzz, Volkswagen began their quest to reach 373 miles on a single charge. If they succeed, they will outperform all other European electric cars on the market.

Under the hood, the van’s two motors put out 369 Horsepower to its all-wheel drive system. This drive system is a departure from the rear-wheel design found on lesser Volkswagen models.

    Recent Videos

  • German Car Brand Pronunciation

    Communicating Sheep - Pixabay - EuroDrift

    For years, people have been debating how to properly pronounce German car brands such as Audi, BMW, and Mercedes-Benz. For many of us, it was simply based on local letter sounds leading to a few varieties of how to say them properly. Now, a German YouTuber called Speed Comparer shared a video correcting the people of the world. The video not only discloses how to properly say German car brand names, it it overall quite hilarious. In this article, we will go over how to properly pronounce German car brands according to Speed Comparer.

    Audi

    For Audi, many people pronounce this wrong due to language sound basics. For instance, letters are pronounced different in English than German. The correct way to say Audi is “Ou-Dee”. The “Ou” sounds similar to saying “Ow” as if you were expressing a sudden pain. Saying “Aww-Dee” or “Auh-Dee” are incorrect according to the German language. Most people pronounce the first two letters of Audi incorrectly leading to the problem. Please note, it is harder to convey how a brand should sound via writing so I am doing my best to sound it out according to the video.

    BMW

    In the case of BMW, most people outside of Germany say literally “BMW”. In Germany, the “W” sounds different which leads to the real name sounding like “BMV”. “BMW” stands for “Bayerische Motoren Werke” which translates to “Bavarian Motor Works”. As expected, “Bayerische Motoren Werke” sounds more like “Buy-Er-Shurr Motoren Verker”. Again, hopefully you are able to sound it correctly from the text but please refer to the video just in case.

    Mercedes-Benz

    For Mercedes-Benz, most people say it exactly how it sounds “Mercedes-Benz” with a long sounded “Benz”. The real way to say this in German sounds like “Murrsaydees-Benz” where the “Benz” is very quickly stated. This is probably the least off-sounding pronunciation compared to the rest. Basically, stating “Mercedes-Benz” in German is much faster paced and sounds more direct to the point while in English it tends to drag on. This is also part of the reason many Americans will refer to Mercedes-Benz as simply “Benz”.

    Opel

    Opel, another German manufacturer, is another example of a mispronounced name. Most people say “O-Pall” while it should be “O-Pell!”. As stated, “Every booger drives an Opel”. Opel is not sold in the United States so it is less commonly spoke of, but still incorrectly. Speed Comparer refers to the Opel as a car for 16-17 year old girl.

    Porsche

    One of the most popular German brands, Porsche, is stated completely wrong by most Americans. In the U.S., most people state “Poor-Shh” while it is properly stated as “Poor-Shah”. You can also think of it as saying “Porscia” where the “c” sounds like a “sh”. You may be thinking that sounds like a girls name, but it is definitely one hell of a car. Porsches are a beautiful feat of engineering and stating the name properly should be the way it is.

    Volkswagen

    Lastly, Volkswagen, or VW, is another common mispronunciation. First, “VW” is pronounced like “Fahl-Vey”. This sounds completely different than speed in English but that is how it sounds. The entire name, “Volkswagen”, sounds like “Fahlkswagen”. The Volkswagen means the “car of the people”. This name probably has the biggest gap in mispronunciation due to letters sounding differently.

    Saying German Car Names Incorrectly is a Way of Life

    Overall, saying German car names incorrectly is a way of life in the U.S. and other parts of the world. This article is simply to bring to light the correct pronunciation of car names, whether you use them or not. Honestly, most people in the U.S. and other parts of the world will probably say your stating it wrong. But, in reality, the German way is how the names are properly stated. Hopefully, you found this article entertaining as well as received help on how to properly say German car brands.

     

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