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How to Care for Your Car in the Winter

During the winter, it’s important to protect both your car’s interior and exterior from the elements. Just keeping it free from dirt and road chemicals can help prevent corrosion as well as maintain a beautiful appearance. We recommend that all car owners follow the “Winter Car Care Checklist” below:


Winter Car Care Checklist

Wash Your Car – FREQUENTLY!
● Dry it Thoroughly
● Wax It – Yes, It Takes Time – But It’s Worth It!
● Clean the Interior – Properly & Thoroughly
● Monitor and Maintain All Fluid Levels
● Install Rubber Floor Mats
● Don’t Park Outside – or at Least Use a Car Cover

 

Wash Your Car – FREQUENTLY!

During the winter, we recommend that you wash your car about every ten days. If it’s particularly nasty outside, you might even want to do it once a week. We know it’s cold outside and the last thing you want to do is mess with a water hose and bucket. An automatic car wash can easily knock off the dirt, and you don’t even have to get out of the car.

On the warmer days, you can spend the extra time it takes to do it right. The point is to make sure you get that road grime off the undercarriage and fenders of your car. If you don’t, it will only take a couple of seasons for rust to show up. That is something you DON’T want!

Use a high-pressure hose and fresh water for cleaning the car. At home, the best way to dissolve salt off your vehicle is with baking soda. Add a generous swig into your wash bucket and use warm water. Make sure you rinse it completely! The baking soda will leave a residue if it’s not rinsed.
As a matter of point, you should always use warm water to wash your car – not hot – warm. Be careful not to do this on days where the temperatures are below freezing. The warm water could cause extremely cold windows to crack.
Use a sponge for soaping and avoid shop towels. Some shop towels contain bits of metal that can scratch the surface of your paint. When cleaning the exterior, make sure to wash under the door handles, behind the mud flaps, and in and around all crevices and cracks of the car. Pay particularly close attention to the undercarriage. That is where the road salt accumulates.

 

Dry Your Car Thoroughly

Running it under one of those hot air blowers at the end of the automatic car wash is NOT going to do the trick. It is important that you dry all the water off the vehicle. Those blowers are better than nothing, but they leave behind droplets. If left untreated, the water may freeze on the car. Granted, most cars have to put up with a bit of ice in the winter. However, if you are washing your car as often as you should, the paint could start to suffer from the frozen liquid.

Make sure you leave the doors open and let the trapped water dry out. Seal the vehicle’s surfaces only after it dries out completely. A chamois is inexpensive and very good for drying off cars. Microfiber towels also work well. Carry a few in your trunk, and you’ll have them when you need them.

To get the car dried before it has a chance to freeze, you may need to wash it in sections. Start with the roof and then work your way to the other sections: driver’s side, passenger’s side, front end, and rear end.

We suggest you start with the roof, for the same reason your mother cleans her house from the top floor down. In the case of your car, water and dirt fall according to gravity. Starting at the top means you won’t dampen areas you already dried.

If water freezes on the car, simply use the hose to remove the ice then clean and dry the region quickly to prevent another occurrence. When using the hose, attempt to aim the hose in a downward direction and avoid spraying other regions of the car. Then, simply dry the sections as you go.

Wax Your Car

No, you don’t have to wax your car every time you wash it. However, you do need to make sure you do a thorough waxing just before the winter season hits. The wax will protect the finish and paint of your vehicle. This is important considering all the abuse your paint takes throughout the

season. Waxing helps preserve the oils in the car’s paint, which lessens the likelihood of oxidation. Delamination and fading lead to costly paint touch-up or repainting. Trust me; it is much less expensive to add that extra coat of wax.

Even though you don’t have to wax every time you wash your car, you really should if possible. When waxing the vehicle, give special attention to its lower parts, such as the quarter panels, the front grille, and behind the wheels, where salt and ice will impact the most. To ensure a smooth application, warm the rag that you’ll be using for applying the wax. Alternatively, you can also use a hair dryer to warm the car’s surface for a more effective application of wax.

 

Clean the Interior – Properly & Thoroughly

There is nothing harder on the interior of a car than snow, slush, and mud. Every person that gets in and out has it on their shoes. Your floor mats are going to start looking pretty bad if you don’t keep them cleaned.

Each time you wash the outside of your car, take a few minutes to vacuum out the interior. Run a duster over the dash and use spot cleaner on the upholstery. If you have leather seats, make sure you get a good leather cleaner. Salt can destroy leather. If you have cloth floor mats – consider getting rubber ones (see below). Shampoo or soap down your floor mats and dry them thoroughly.

 

Monitor and Maintain Fluid Levels

Cold weather is hard on a car. It takes a while to warm up the engine and fluids tend to move around sluggishly until it gets going. To ensure the smooth function of your car during the cold weather, it’s crucial that you maintain its fluid levels.

The very first thing you need to do is to replace the windshield washing fluid from summer with a winter blend. You do NOT want your washer fluid freezing on your windshield as you are driving down the road.

You also need to check the coolant and oil levels of the vehicle to eliminate the possibilities of internal damage. Keep the gas tank at least halfway full to keep the gas lines from freezing. By maintaining the fluid levels, you can avoid any unnecessary car downtime in the snow.

 

Install Rubber Floor Mats

While this seems like a no-brainer, it’s amazing how many people don’t have winter floor mats. There are all sorts of rubberized mats available, in all price ranges. Some companies sell mats specifically designed to fit certain models of car, or you can buy universal mats.

If you don’t have mats, at least put down a thick towel or, in a pinch, a trash bag. Use anything you can find to keep that salt and water off your floors. It’s not just the look of the floor mats that you need to worry about. Your car’s floorboards can rust through from the top just as easily as they can from the bottom. Keep them dry!

 

Don’t Park Outside – or at Least Use a Car Cover

All cars deserve a heated garage, but sadly, most car owners have other things to worry about, like mortgages and hungry kids. If you can pamper your vehicle by keeping it in a heated garage – do it!

If you have an unheated garage and can clear out the bikes, mowers, and trash bins to make room for your car – do it!

However, if you don’t have a garage (or you just can’t clean out enough junk to make it usable) the least you can do is cover your car. Find parking in a clean, snow-free place. Purchase a car cover for the whole car if possible. You can buy custom car covers and universal ones from any number of suppliers. At the very least – get a windshield cover. You won’t be able to protect your paint – but you can at least save yourself the rigors of scraping.

Next to your home, your car is more than likely the second largest financial investment you’ve made. With just a little bit of care and prevention, you can keep your vehicle in tip-top shape and retain some of its value. Don’t let winter grime destroy your vehicle with delamination, cracking, or rust. Follow our “Winter Car Care Checklist” and keep your ride looking good.

 

Additional Tips for Winter Car Care

▪ Keep an ice scraper and snow shovel in your car year around, so you don’t forget.
▪ Apply tire coating or cleaner in order to ensure smooth functioning of your vehicle.
▪ Clean the windshield properly during the winter by using anti-frost washer fluid.
▪ If you have to park your car outdoors, cover it properly with a quality cover.
▪ Replace wiper blades every year to make sure you have optimal visibility.
▪ Use a mild shampoo when washing your car and dry it thoroughly.
▪ Tire cleaners can help remove salt from the sidewalls and treads.

 

References
http://www.angieslist.com/articles/dont-get-salty-5-ways-keep-your-car-clean-winter.htm
http://www.autogeek.net/winter-car-care.html
https://www.stouffvilletoyotascion.ca/resources/2014-02-14-clean-and-safe/
https://www.turtlewax.com/pro-tips/how-to-prep-your-car-for-winter
http://www.wikihow.com/Wash-Your-Car-in-the-Wintertime

The 5 Steps to Checking Tire Air Pressure (PSI)

The air pressure in your tires can vary from day to day. This doesn’t mean you have a leak or a bad valve stem; it’s just science. Temperature is the biggest factor in changing tire pressure. As the temperature increases, the air pressure builds in the tire. Conversely, when it gets colder, the pressure decreases and your tire can even look flat. This is why you need to check your tire pressure and air up your tires on a regular basis.

Of course, it could be that you have a leaky tire or a faulty valve stem. That doesn’t necessarily mean you need a new tire. Valve stems can be replaced for almost nothing, and a lot of tires can be patched or sealed. The best thing to do if you think you have a leak is to have a professional evaluate your tires. But first, make sure your pressure is correct and check the weather. If you have a leak, the pressure will go down even if the temperatures don’t.

 

How to Check Your Tire Pressure:

1. Locate the Factory Required PSI Values
2. Remove the Valve Stem Cap
3. Use the Air Pressure Gauge to Check PSI
4. Inspect the Air Pressure Gauge and Re-Test
5. Re-Install the Valve Stem Cap

 

#1 – Locate the Factory Required PSI Values

The optimal pressure for factory tires is located in both the owner’s manual and inside the car. On the driver’s door, there should be a sticker located about halfway down. Look at the part of the door that is covered when it’s closed (the edge).

You can also look at the tire itself. If you have installed after-market wheels or new tires, you definitely want to check the value on the tires, in addition to the owner’s manual. The PSI value can be located on the tire’s sidewall in very small print.

The number provided on the inside of the door will mostly likely differ from the number on the tire. That’s because the PSI on the inside of your door represents the ideal ride based on the car’s suspension and handling. The value on the tire sidewall is the maximum PSI value that the tire can hold. Anything more and you run the risk of a blowout on the street.

It’s always best to use the manufacturer’s recommended PSI when filling stock tires. However, some adjustment can be made for temperature. In cold weather, the pressure inside the tire drops a bit, and during hot weather, it increases. Because of this, you do need to check your pressure regularly.

Use the tire’s maximum pressure rating on the sidewall as a guideline during weather adjustments and also as a way to judge the correct pressure in custom wheels. The tires on most passenger vehicles range from 27 to 32 PSI while SUVs and trucks usually require 31 to 40 PSI.

 

A “Word of Caution” About Recommended PSI

The PSI values from the manufacturer are recommendations only. These values are not the maximum or minimum value for the tire pressure. Going with a lower PSI than recommended can provide traction on sand or snow while adding PSI can increase fuel efficiency.

However, you need to be careful if don’t follow the manufacturer’s recommendation. Lowering the tire pressure below the recommendation may decrease braking distances. Raising the tire pressure could cause uneven tire wear and increase braking distances.

EuroDrift recommends following the car and tire manufacturer values for PSI. The car manufacturer’s numbers are optimal for car handling. Never go above the tire manufacturer’s PSI numbers, or you might suffer a blowout. Keeping your pressure between the two for safety.

 

#2 – Remove the Valve Stem Cap

To remove the valve stem cap, simply unscrew it from the valve stem. The valve stem cap covers the valve stem to ensure there is no debris buildup in the stem. It is highly recommended that you have a valve stem cap on each tire as well as on your spare tire. If someone steals your valve stem cap, you can easily locate a replacement at any automotive retailer (i.e. Pep Boys).

 

#3 – Use the Air Pressure Gauge to Check PSI

To use the air pressure gauge, align the opening on the gauge over the valve stem. Press down firmly and evenly. This pushes the valve stem pin inward causing air to leak out through the stem and exert pressure on the gauge. You might hear a slight hissing noise as you engage the valve stem pin. However, if you have aligned the gauge correctly and pressed evenly, the noise should all but disappear.

If the reading is taken while air is leaking from the connection of the gauge and the stem, then it will not be correct. Realign the two if necessary and try again.

Depending on whether you have an electrical or mechanical air pressure gauge, the result could be different. An electrical pressure gauge provides you with a digital reading on the air pressure. The electrical pressure gauge is also more reliable than a mechanical gauge if it is calibrated correctly.

The mechanical gauge is more common and has been around for decades. A mechanical gauge uses the air pressure to move a rectangular prism within a cylinder at a distance that equates to PSI. For example, if there is 32 PSI in the tire then the air pressure will move the prism to the 32 PSI marker on the display.

 

#4 – Inspect the Air Pressure Gauge and Re-Test

To inspect the air pressure gauge value, simply read the display on an electronic gauge or inspect the line value on the mechanical gauge. The reading on the air gauge should make sense, and it is always a great idea to check multiple times. There is always the chance that the air pressure reading of the tire will be off due to human error. Simply not angling the gauge properly can cause the reading to be incorrect.

To make sure the tire PSI value is correct, test the PSI of the tire until the same reading is obtained two or three times. This way you can spot an erroneous reading. Differences in pressure readings could be due to human error, or it could be your gauge. Some tools are more accurate than others, and it could be that your air gauge is not working properly.

Consistent readings should indicate that you are measuring correctly and your equipment is working.

 

#5 – Re-Install the Valve Stem Cap

To reinstall the valve stem cap, simply screw the cap back onto the valve stem. Make sure that the cap isn’t loose but be careful not to overtighten the cap. Over-tightening the cap may strip the threads inside and possibly damage the stem.

You should check your tire pressure each time you fill the gas tank, before trips, or if you even think there might be a problem. You will know there is a problem when the car isn’t handling correctly. Look for bulging sidewalls or uneven wear on the treads. All of these are indicators that your pressure is not quite right.

It only takes a minute to check and adjust the tire pressure. Doing so just might save you from a blowout or an accident. Oh – and don’t forget to check the spare! It’s important to keep it aired up along with the other tires.

 

References
http://www.wikihow.com/Check-Air-Pressure-in-Tires
http://www.dmv.org/how-to-guides/check-tire-pressure.php

Top 5 Methods for Automotive Dent Repairs At Home

However it happens – a parking lot, hail damage, or just your kids playing ball – a car dent can be extremely frustrating. Your car now looks less than perfect and repairing it costs money.  In an effort to help, we consulted with a professional and he shared a few dent repair tricks that you can try at home. For minor damage, these techniques could save you money.

 

5 Methods Used to Remove Small Dents in Cars

  • Boiling Water
  • Compressed Air & Hair Dryer
  • Dry Ice
  • Plunger
  • Specialty Tool

 

Boiling Water

The boiling water method requires the least amount of effort and is really only effective for plastic bumpers. Simply boil some water, pour it over the dent, and then reach behind and pop it out.  Finally, pouring hot water over a dent softens the material, allowing it to flex.

To complete this method, simply pour boiling water over the dent, reach behind the damaged bumper, and press it back into its normal shape.  Once you are satisfied with the repair, pour cool water over the area to set the material and avoid any further reshaping.

It is important to note the obvious:  boiling water is hot.  Take appropriate precautions.  Wear gloves and work quickly.  Avoid using this method during winter weather as bad things can happen when boiling water is poured on materials that are below freezing.

 

Compressed Air & Hair Dryer

This method requires only a can of compressed air and a hair dryer.  The first step is to heat the dent area with the hair dryer on the highest setting.  This should be done while maintaining a distance of at least 6 inches.  The dent should be heated until it feels hot, but caution should be used to prevent damaging the paint.  Don’t allow the hair dryer to linger too long in one spot.

Once the dent is hot enough, turn a compressed air can upside down and spray it over the region of the dent.  When a can of compressed air is turned upside down, depressing the nozzle will produce a freezing liquid, rather than a strong puff of air.  The rapid temperature reduction encourages the metal to contract, reducing the size of the dent and, in some cases, removing the dent entirely.

A word of caution:  the liquid that is produced by a can of compressed air is cold enough to cause instant frostbite.  Wear gloves and eye protection.

 

Dry Ice

Dry ice is frozen carbon dioxide.  Yes, it is cold.  The surface temperature of dry ice is -109.3 degrees Fahrenheit. Don’t touch it with your bare hands.  To use this technique, put on a pair of protective gloves and rub the dry ice on the dent.  Continue until the dent is gone or sufficiently reduced in size.  It is sometimes helpful to preheat the dent with a hair dryer, as with the canned air method.  Both of these methods work to contract the metal with a rapid drop in temperature.

 

Plunger

Grab a suction cup, stick it to the dent, and pull.  Smaller suction cups and plungers work better for this task than larger plungers (like toilet plungers) that are likely to cover too much surface area to be effective.  Collision repair centers sometimes use a technique similar to this to remove dents and straighten body panels.  Of course, they use tools that are a bit more effective (and expensive).

Fortunately, many dents can be removed or reduced with this method.  When affixing the suction cup to the dent, be certain not to push any harder than is required to get a good seal.  Pull on the tool to raise the dent back to flush.  You will find that the metal will retract a bit after each pull, so you may have to do this several times to remove the dent.  Stick with it and you may be rewarded with impressive results.

 

Specialty Tool

While specialty dent removal tools are readily available for purchase, they are expensive and require a good deal of training to use properly.  Professional dent removal tools are inserted through an appropriate access point. Then, the dent can be massaged out from behind the damaged panel.

There are several sizes, shapes, and styles of paintless dent removal tools.  If you choose to take this route, do yourself a favor and get some training.  Professional paintless dent removal (PDR) services are popular because they are less expensive than a collision shop.

Minor dent removal is something that most vehicle owners can tackle.  There are some dent types that are best left to the professionals.  If your dent is deep or has a crease running through it, you will likely be unable to produce a satisfactory repair without the proper tools and training. Fortunately, many of the dings and dents of daily driving can be addressed by a willing do-it-yourselfer with only a small amount of effort.

 

 

Audi of America New Product Open House 2015

In July of 2015, Audi of America showcased their newest vehicles to the Audi Club of North America, Northeast Sector. At the event, they unveiled the new Audi A3 Sportback e-tron, the Audi Q3, the Audi Q7, and the Audi TT Roadster.

For each model, a presentation of the vehicle was given by each of the corresponding product managers. Further, a spotlight was shown on the new and innovative technology features Audi incorporated into each of these cars. Based on the presentations, it is obvious that Audi plans to play competitively in an ever-changing market. Technology such as the new night vision system found in the Q7 was just one of the features seen at the event.

Audi Attendee Parking Lot - Audi of America New Product Open House 2015 - EuroDrift

Audi Attendee Parking Lot – Audi of America New Product Open House 2015

Audi Attendee Parking Lot - Audi of America New Product Open House 2015 - EuroDrift

Audi Attendee Parking Lot – Audi of America New Product Open House 2015

Above, the attendee parking lot contains multiple Audi vehicles, ranging from the Audi A4/S4 to the Audi A5/S5/RS5.  

 

The Audi A3 e-tron Boasts Zero Emissions

The primary selling point of the Audi A3 is that it’s a hybrid. The 1.4-liter gas engine cooperates with a water-cooled, three-phase AC electric generator for better gas efficiency. When the A3 Sportback e-tron is in hybrid mode, it can boast as much as 86 MPGe when you factor in EV driving.

Whether you prefer the slightly less expensive Audi A3 or the more sporty A3 Sporback, the e-tron promises to be a strong competitor in the hybrid market.

Below, the 2016 Audi A3 Sportback e-tron can be seen from multiple angles.

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Mod Enthusiasts Turn to the Audi S3

At the show, the Audi S3 was displayed in the sporty color combinations of green and orange. This look suits the S3, which is a sporty car that pushes about 292 HP. The 2.0 TFSI engine and frame construction make the Audi S3 both lightweight and fast. Car tuners looking for a higher end car to modify will love the S3. Although it is in the lower level of the S-model range of cars, this particular vehicle could very likely develop a cult-like following among mod enthusiasts.

Below, the 2016 Audi S3 can be seen from multiple angles.

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The Audi Q7 Undergoes a Complete Transformation

Audi completely switched up both the design and fabrication of the 2016 Audi Q7. The car is now being built on its own platform and sporting a whole new look.  On the front end, the grille is one of the biggest changes. This new grille design has been combined with the re-design of the headlights which contain both LED lights for daylight and nighttime driving. This new headlight technology is way ahead of industry standards.

The car has multiple cameras and sensors on the front and back that help with everything from cruise control to night vision and parking sensors.  One of the biggest technological features of the Q7 is the night vision sensor. When an object, such as a deer or pedestrian, is detected in front of the car, the brakes are automatically engaged. This technology could protect against life-threatening accidents at night when visibility is low.

New Technology Center

The rear of the Q7 has LED taillights and there is a new technology center inside the car. The technology center includes the new Audi computer software and a mouse pad style control. Lastly, the Q7 has third-row seating to allow up to seven passengers as well as an electronic tow hook that can be hidden away when not in use.

Below, the front of the 2016 Audi Q7 can be seen.

2016 Audi Q7 - Front - Audi of America New Product Open House - EuroDrift

2016 Audi Q7 – Front – Audi of America New Product Open House

 

The Audi TT Roadster

The design of the new Audi TT Roadster is based on the curves of the Audi R8.  Inside the vehicle, the seats have a beautiful cross-stitch pattern which adds to the overall appeal. Another big change inside the car is that the navigation screen is now behind the steering wheel with the speedometer and tachometer. This allows the driver to keep their eyes on the road while using the screen.

The new headlights and front-end replicate the R8 and take the TT to another level of sporty design. The fenders stick out on the sides providing it a sportier look. The back has the typical TT shape, but with some minor changes such as the taillights. This new TT comes with the 2.0 TFSI motor used in Audi’s newer models.

Transmission

Despite the fact that this small coupe delivers on horsepower, a standard Audi TT cannot be bought with a manual transmission. The small two-seater only comes with Quattro all-wheel drive and a six-speed, automatic transmission.

Below, tthe 2016 Audi TT Roadster can be seen from multiple angles.

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Audi continues to give competitors such as BMW and Mercedes-Benz a run for their money. Without a doubt, their German engineering is both innovative and reliable. The luxuries they offer make Audi the perfect vehicle for those purchasing in the mid-range market. As exhibited at the New Product Show, Audi hopes to draw consumers with cutting-edge technology and sportier designs.

The Audi A3 Sportback e-tron will lead Audi into the world of hybrid vehicles, while the other models will certainly appeal to both families and Sportster enthusiasts.

 

Audi A3 e-tron Brochure

http://audilibrary.audiusa.com/viewer/brochures/16/en_US.audi.Brochures.2016.etron/

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